Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Minneapolis 2040 Charts and Maps

Some charts and maps to consider as we close in on the comment deadline for the draft of the Minneapolis 2040 comprehensive plan. You have until July 22 to comment at minneapolis2040.com!

Sunday, July 15, 2018

Minneapolis 2040 Deadline Roundup


There's just one week left in the comment period for the draft Minneapolis 2040 Comprehensive Plan! Concerned residents assured me it would be shoved down our throats, but I'm not sure my throat could handle a lengthier process.

Leave your comments at minneapolis2040.com until July 22. The city will spend a few months synthesizing that feedback into a new draft to be released in late September.

Below I have compiled the latest news on the comprehensive plan, including two presentations to City Council committees earlier this week.

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

Beyond Apocalyptic Yard Signs


It’s a maddening time lately, with political actors denying obvious truths and using scare tactics to sidestep honest dialogue. In any debate about change, political winds favor the side with the simple message: NO. It's easy to fearmonger, deceive, and put words on lawn signs that conjure impending annihilation.

I like to think Minneapolis is better than that. In Minneapolis we recognize real problems and act to solve them. We recognize that housing is in short supply and unacceptably expensive for too many of our neighbors. We recognize that climate change is real, and is driven by lifestyles made necessary by our region's sprawling, auto-oriented development patterns. We recognize that nobody should have opportunity limited by the fact they can’t afford to live in the right neighborhood.

To foster an honest conversation about the Minneapolis 2040 Comprehensive Plan, let’s focus on this widely recognized fact: Minneapolis doesn’t have enough homes. MPR reports that the fabled “starter home” is disappearing from the Twin Cities due to a combination of factors: “land, laws, labor, and lumber.” For the sake of conversation, here's a few examples of things affecting the cost housing:
  • Energy efficiency standards substantially add to the cost of a new home
  • Land on which to build new homes is made more expensive because of growth boundaries
  • Restrictions in zoning codes all across the Twin Cities prevent building “twin homes” (or fourplexes, or apartments, or anything that’s not a single-family home) that share a wall and sell for much less than an equivalent single-family home 
  • Car parking requirements add to the cost of every unit of housing, especially when it’s a massive parking structure
If we can agree to the facts (that these things affect the cost of housing), then -- and only then -- we can move to what should come next: an actual conversation about what we value.

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

U.S. Senate Candidate Richard Painter Delivers 11 Classic Movie Monologues


Richard Painter is a candidate for the U.S. Senate in Minnesota whose new "dumpster fire" political ad is setting social media ablaze. To capitalize on the firestorm (and inspired by this tweet), here's 11 classic movie monologues dubbed over Richard Painter's new commercial.

Thursday, June 7, 2018

People of the Lakes React to Minneapolis 2040

Last night, a coalition of Lakes-area neighborhood organizations hosted a public meeting in beautiful lakeside Lowry Hill. City Council Member Lisa Goodman and Heather Worthington (Minneapolis director of Long Range Planning) in the same room for a Minneapolis 2040 showdown! Turns out there was no showdown aside from Worthington referring to Goodman as Lisa McDonald. But other things did happen. Last night's tweets have been lightly edited into the article below. 

(comment on the Minneapolis 2040 plan)


Monday, June 4, 2018

A "Pro-Family" Comprehensive Plan


One of the common criticisms you hear about the Minneapolis 2040 draft comprehensive plan, if you go to enough public meetings, is that it's anti-family. People say if you want to support families, you've got to restrict the vast majority of city land for single-family homes. This criticism doesn't hold water unless the only kind of family you're concerned about is a white family of significant means. It turns out a lot of current Minneapolis families live in something other than a single-family home.

Comparing pro-family credentials of two very different Minneapolis neighborhoods.

Thursday, May 24, 2018

Plan Meets Skepticism with Older Crowd in SW Minneapolis


I made my way to Southwest High in Linden Hills yesterday for a "Palmisano Presents" community forum on the Minneapolis 2040 Comprehensive Plan (👈 leave your feedback!). This is a lightly edited tweet transcript from last night's live coverage. Don't miss the Hitchcockian "Palmisano Presents" opening credits video.

Ward 13 Council Member Linea Palmisano begins by saying she has received "numerous calls, emails, and handwritten letters."

Palmisano more than once referring to Heather Worthington, who is the City's director of Long Range Planning, as the "owner" of this comprehensive plan. Palmisano says, "I don't endorse this draft in its current form. This is not my work. I have a lot of concerns." Palmisano says the plan has the "right goals."